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401(k) Marketing

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San Diego, CA 92101

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401(k) Marketing, LLC is not in the business of providing legal advice with respect to ERISA or any other applicable law. The materials and information do not constitute, and should not be relied upon as, legal advice. The materials are general in nature and intended for informational purposes only. All content, including any brochures or other materials designed for potential use with plan sponsors, fiduciaries, and plan participants, must be reviewed and approved by the compliance and legal department(s) of the Financial Professional and/or Third Party Administrators firm prior to any use to confirm that they meet the firm’s legal and compliance policies and standards. The Financial Professional, Third Party Administrator,  and his/her firm are solely responsible for the use of content and any materials included herein, and for ensuring that all services provided by the Financial Professional and Third Party Administrators conform to the firm’s legal and compliance policies and standards.

Information for our community about COVID-19

Learn what we’re doing to navigate this unprecedented situation.

Coronavirus and Retirement Savings

Lessons to help mitigate long-term retirement savings mistakes

 

It’s easy to say “stay calm” but harder to actually walk the walk.

 

Keeping emotions out of investment strategies can be challenging even on a normal day. Add a dose of a health pandemic, in this case, the worldwide coronavirus, and you could have a recipe for widespread investor panic. Unfortunately, that recipe could be a breeding ground for long-term retirement savings consequences. 

 

As we have seen, COVID-19 is wreaking havoc on financial markets, both in the U.S. and abroad. Recently, the Dow Jones Industrial Index has resembled a car dealership air dancer, wildly flailing about, bending all the way to the ground and then randomly bouncing straight back up for a moment or two.

 

However, there are lessons to learn from history. By looking back in time, we might be able to educate and inform investor actions today.

 

Lesson #1: Dollar Cost Averaging

 

It is a simple investment strategy where plan participants invest a fixed amount into the same fund or investment asset over a gradual period of time. When the investment prices are reduced, investors get a chance to purchase more units, and this can help to reduce price volatility.

 

Lesson #2: Past performance is no guarantee of future results

 

Participants should focus on their long-term financial goals, not short-term fluctuations. Even during such market fluctuations as the 2001 tech bubble, the 2008 market crash and the Great Recession, the average growth rate of the S&P 500 still produced positive annual returns.

 

Lesson #3: Timing the market

 

To weather difficult market turns, portfolios should reflect both risk and asset allocation approach. This includes diversification, both regionally and by-product (stocks, bonds, cash and alternative asset classes). Participants should avoid making any knee jerk reactions, such as moving all of their assets from equities to bonds in the hopes of avoiding any losses due to volatility.

 

Lesson #4: Throwing in the towel

 

Post-2008, one study found that 27% of respondents either stopped saving for retirement or adding to their 401(k).[1] At the same time, according to a Fidelity Investments report, the average 401(k) retirement plan balance rose by 466% to $297,700 between 2009 and 2019.[2] Millennials’ average retirement savings of $7,000 in Q1 of 2009 grew 1,762% to just under $130,000 in 2019. Translation: participants shouldn’t stop saving for retirement in market downturns.

 

Lastly, try not to watch the markets with myopic intensity. The U.S. is currently experiencing low unemployment, solid GDP and job growth, and a so-called “Goldilocks” economy (overall, neither too hot or cold).

 

Analysis after analysis of past financial events shows that when investors don’t make panicked decisions, they are more likely to ride out volatility and come out ahead. 

 

While we understand that is all easier said than done, please contact us if you have any questions, concerns, and/or want to talk because we’re here to help.

[1] “Betterment’s Consumer Financial Perspectives Report: 10 Years after the Crash.” Sept 2018. Betterment. https://www.betterment.com/uploads/2018/09/Betterment-Consumer-Financial-Perspectives-Report.pdf

[2] “Fidelity® Q1 2019 Retirement Analysis: Account Balances Rebound From Dip In Q4, While Savings Rates Hit Record Levels.” May 2019. Fidelity.  https://www.fidelity.com/bin-public/060_www_fidelity_com/documents/press-release/quarterly-retirement-trends-050919.pdf